Creating the Garden

Here you come to some of the fruits of commandscripting. Because 3d plants of any kind use up great amounts of computer resources command scripting is invaluable in this case because it lets you create an unlimited amount of landscaping layouts without the hassle of waiting for screen redraws. You then save the layout to a commandscript.

You do this by creating 2d plant symbols with a point attached to them. By arranging the 2d plant symbols over any plan you can create quickly and efficiently an infinite variety of landscaping layouts. Latter you combine the location of the 2d plants with a  file merge of the 3d plants into a script and you have a high polygon count 3d landscape without getting into screen redraw times. I have included all the plant models for you. Latter after you see how the tutorial works you can reference your own 3d plants.

1. I created a library of 3d plants first at the proper scale and saved them at world 0,0,0 as polygon meshes.
2. I also created a library of 2d plants (see image below) and traced over the top view of each 3d plant. I assigned their file names to layers but you could also assign them to icons that are on a custom Toolbar called plant library.
3. I arranged the plants using the 2d symbols ontop of a plan of the peristyle garden. Creating different garden layouts was easy because I did it in 2d. See figure below of a the placement of a tree in action. The techinique is to keep your 2d plant symbol library away from the top plan view of your subject in this case the Peristyle garden. You copy the 2dsymbol and its' point using snap to point  from the 2dsymbol viewport. You then move your mouse into the top viewport and arrange your 2d symbols on the plan. You can play with this yourself by opening the file 2dgrd01.3dm. and moving the symbols around.

A different garden layout below.

4. I opened notepad and pasted the file name and path of each plant file. At first this is a bit tedious but this reference can grow and be used again and again. I have already done this for you in the script below.
5. Using evaluate point command I copied and then pasted the location of each plant into the script. To learn the complete details behind this process and to leran more about my approaches on creating realistic terrain's and landscaping tutorials in Rhino visit my website at www.3dEdge.com

 This is only one of many commanscripts that I tested.

Always put your landscaping scripts last in the command script. This is because these are the heavy polygon objects and once imported you can forget doing anything besides clicking the render button.

***Complete*Gardenlayout*Script***
! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\grass01.3dm
! selnone

! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\Edgingflowers.3dm
! selnone

! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\fruittree01.3dm
move
w0
-7.22178,-2.40791,0
! enter
! selnone
! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\flowersring01.3dm
! selnone

! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\smalltree02.3dm
copy
w0
-6.39603,2.85085,0
7.23727,-2.60423,0
! delete
! selnone
enter

! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\orangetreevase.3dm
move
w0
0.0268901,2.31754,0
enter
Rotate
R0,0,0
47
! selnone
! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\hibiscusvase.3dm
move
w0
0.036179,-1.26676,0
Rotate
R0,0,0
60
! selnone

! merge
c:\tutorialscripts\plants\cypress.3dm
copy
w0
-4.52721,3.37238,0
-1.8761,3.4593,0
2.68729,3.4593,0
5.29494,3.4593,0
! delete
! selnone
enter